All posts by bunburymagazine

Episode 5: Make Them Feel Small.

 

Welcome to episode 5 of The Bunbury Speaks Podcast!

This time we had the the pleasure of talking to the fantastic Mike Bedigan. We covered many topics and had a good few laughs and of course, heard Mike’s marvelous addition to our story.

We also wish Mike all the success possible with his Masters degree and future.

As always the music was by the brilliant Midlane, click on his face below for more!

It was produced by Keri Moriarty for the internet.

Liked this podcast? Want to help Bunbury carry on bringing you wonderful entertainment? Please hit the donate link below and give what you can. We love what we do and hope you love it too.
Thank you.

Donate to The Bunbury Speaks

All that said, we hope you enjoy the podcast.

Happy listening,

Much love,
Team Bunbury

I Remember Judge Tuxedo

Episode 4 of the Bunbury Speaks Podcast is here! We interviewed a guy you’ll all have heard about from our other podcasts because he did the music! It’s none other than out very own Scott Midlane.

In this podcast we cover a lot of topics ans here are the links we spoke about:
To find Scott’s wonderful music

Midlane
Third Man Phenomenon
Scabeater

And his new single Rag Doll 

Check all of this great stuff out!

Check out the wonderful work from Howard Sinclair Photography

If you’d like to find out more or have questions about Diabetes, please follow the following link
www.diabetes.org.uk

As always the music was by the brilliant Midlane, click on his face below for more!

It was produced by Keri Moriarty for the internet.

Liked this podcast? Want to help Bunbury carry on bringing you wonderful entertainment? Please hit the donate link below and give what you can. We love what we do and hope you love it too.
Thank you.

Donate to The Bunbury Speaks

All that said, we hope you enjoy the podcast.

Happy listening,

Much love,
Team Bunbury

Hannah Moss: Meadow by Meadow – A Review

Opium Bar, 6.15, 4-11th August

Bunbury Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Hannah Moss’s character-comedy ‘Meadow by Meadow’ is her solo debut at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and its fantastically unsettling.

Moss is a highly physical performer, and though her level of audience participation is well out of the average person’s comfort zone, her ability to break the ice without breaking character is both fascinating and exciting.

To quote the show’s tagline,, “the rules are: there are no rules”, and within minutes this is evident. The show twists and turns, leaving you clueless, and sometimes a little apprehensive as to what’s coming next, but Moss delivers each and every time.

The show proves Moss to be a risk taker, and its pays off in her remarkable sense of authority as a performer, as she draws the audience into her wild shenanigans. Meadow is a brave and audacious character, and for much of the time you don’t know whether to think her sinister or silly. Moss’s delivery confirms the balance brilliantly.

For anyone who likes dark comedy combined with edge-of-seat uncertainty, Hannah Moss is absolutely one to watch.

George Dimarelos: George Michael Is Greek – A Review

City Cafe (Venue 85), 8:20, 2-12, 14-26 August

Bunbury Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️

George Dimarelos has taken his show, ‘George Michael is Greek’, to Peth and Melbourne. This is, therefore, a well-travelled show, with a host whose charisma and ability to charm an audience is unavoidable. He has a certain cheeky, laddish sense of humour which is lapped up across the room.

The George Michael stunt doesn’t hurt either, as Dimarelos appears on stage costumed with a white shirt and leather jacket. Appealing to the inevitable George Michael fans misguidedly expecting a tribute act, you could say there’s something for everyone in this show.

Dimarelos is perhaps not the most original comedian of the Fringe – his comedy is somewhat predictable and not overwhelmingly unique, while the charm of the cocky schoolboy vibe doesn’t last all too quickly.

That being said, Dimarelos is fairly entertaining, and his vaguely self-effacing cheeriness wins him many points with the audience. His well-timed comedy carries with it a particular appeal that will undoubtedly strike a chord with many.

Tom Taylor: Abridged – A Review

Bunbury Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Laughing Horse @ City Café, 16:55

As a first impression, Tom Taylor comes across with the mannerisms of an awkward teenage boy trying to impress a girl that he likes – self-conscious, slightly uncomfortable and likable, in a very funny way. A cross between Jon Richardson and Tim Minchin, Taylor’s demeanour is lively and characterful, whilst giving the impression of being endearingly ill-at-ease.

His comedy is delightfully silly whilst being remarkably clever. Taylor’s timing for an unexpected pun is flawless, and although his comedy sometimes seems a little random, it is never once to the show’s detriment.

The intermittent appearance of the keyboard is a nice aid to the laughter. Though a slightly eccentric trademark, it never appears too gimmicky, but offers perfect accompaniment for sharp one-liners.

Between this, his self-aware comedy and his peculiar charisma, Taylor has the show down to a perfect formula, which manages to stay original and unpredictable throughout. ‘Abriged’ is a rare, unusual and intelligent show.

 

Henry Paker: Man Alive – A Review

@ The Banshee Labyrinth (Venue 156), 17:10

Bunbury Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Comedian and cartoonist Henry Paker exudes creativity on many levels in this fantastically imaginative show. His visual accompaniments showcase charming talent, and instantly captivate the audience, as he takes us through a visual exploration of his career.

With his observational humour, his takes on marriage (and its trials), holidays, arguments and middle class life take confessionalism to the next level, as his analysis of the mundane and everyday aspects of life is delivered with simultaneously astonishing realism and bright humour. Paker is matter-of-fact without veering into cynicism, with an approach that, no matter what, feels vivid and lively.

The show often ranges into the absurd but never fails to be brilliant. Aside from his sharp, witty stand-up comedy, the show also includes a handful of surprises sure to delight any audience.

‘Man Alive’ is daring, funny, fascinating and entirely original. Proving a brilliant mind and unique talent, this is comedy of remarkable quality.

David Tsonos: Walking the Cat 2

@ Bar Bados (32), 19:00, 4-14, 16-25

Bunbury Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️

David Tsonos, comedian and apparently professional cat lover, presents the follow up to his solo show ‘Walking the Cat’. Featuring many, many new cat tales (pun intended), his tame but likeable comedy coupled with his awkward charisma makes for a consistently entertaining show.

Tsonos’ humour is upbeat, and his storytelling shows a sympathetic, amiable character. There’s a certain self-consciousness to his manner which only adds to his comedic timing.

Although Tsonos can hardly be considered one of the big risk takers of this years Fringe, there’s little to find disagreeable in his inoffensive anecdotal comedy. He keeps the laughs coming fairly steadily, and although not particularly groundbreaking, the show is nevertheless enjoyable.

Altogether, the show is at the very least, a cat lovers paradise. Anyone looking for a few laughs, and some lovely cat pictures is in very good company with Tsonos.

Sooz Kempner: Super Sonic 90s Kid – A Review

Bunbury Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Sooz Kempner’s ‘Super Sonic 90s Kid’ feels like a wonderful trip down memory lane for anyone who considers themselves a 90s kid. Aside from the nostalgic exploration of her love affair with Sonic the Hedgehog, the show feels equally like a beautifully put-together collage of Sooz herself, in such a way that you can’t help but find her totally lovable.

There’s a certain sentimentality to the show that, coupled with Kempner’s magical sense of humour, is bright, imaginative, and completely captivating. Her visual accompaniments are matched by a comedic timing as smooth as clockwork, never overly relied upon but perfectly punctuating wickedly funny storytelling.

A woman of many talents, she also demonstrates her remarkable theatrical skills with a handful of musical numbers. The show is a uniquely orchestrated array of gifts, brave and adventurous but always thoroughly charming and entertaining.

However, the show’s most striking aspect is just how immersive it is; its combination of personal history, 90s retrospect and giddy comedy has you utterly invested right through to the final moments.

Altogether, ‘Super Sonic 90s Kid’ demonstrates Kempner to be perhaps one of the most original voices in comedy. A show in a league of its own, it is perhaps one of the year’s Fringe essentials.

Globe Bar (Venue 161) @ 13:00, until 26th August

Kate Smurthwaite: Clit Stirrer

Bunbury Rating – ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

For those perhaps previously unfamiliar with Fringe favourite Kate Smurthwaite, she introduces herself to us via her reputation as “provocative”. No stranger to the label, this show celebrates her ability to shock and outrage. ‘Clit Stirrer’ is a diverse collection of brutal, challenging, but important stories, punctuated with Smurthwaite’s unique and ingenious humour. Presenting a show no more predictable than the woman herself, she wears the world’s horrors on her sleeve with such originality and wit, that there is simply no arguing with it – she is brilliant.

Even the most dark and uncomfortable realities she addresses are presented in such an honest and accessible way, that no matter how dark it gets, you can’t help but leave with a sense of optimism. Smurthwaite exudes a passion and self-assuredness onstage which is both infectious and empowering.

Between storytelling, sketches, one-liners and reflections over her career, Smurthwaite emerges, politically and comedically, as a force to be reckoned with. Her refreshingly outspoken comedy will undoubtedly leave you hanging on her every word.

‘Clit Stirrer’ is at The Banshee Labyrinth @ 7:30 until August 26th.

John Robertson: The Dark Room

John Robertson: The Dark Room
20:00 Underbelly, White Belly (Venue 61) until Aug 26th

Bunbury Rating – ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

I have waited for three years to see this show. The Dark Room is without a doubt one of the best things I’ve ever seen. It’s everything it promises and more besides. As the game is played by audience members, it becomes increasingly funny and slightly frustrating, just like the real text based video games of consoles past.
The writing, the stage presence and presentation for me was completely perfect. The feeling of spontaneity and crowd work sets this show apart.  The democracy round is another stroke of genius where people practically tear out their vocal chords to be heard and make a difference…
It is a highly odd experience to be made to feel like you’re working with and against those around you to try and beat the game.

The only down side is that every now and again, the memory of this marvellous show will pop into my head and for no apparent reason, I find myself whispering ‘You awake to find yourself in a dark room’. This I’m told is slightly unnerving for the rest of my colleagues but who cares?

There are so many reasons to see this dark humoured show from the exceptional writing to the character work of Mr John Robertson, this is really some top draw stuff that’s worth every penny and more.

Tickets can be bought here:

http://bit.ly/2L7jZbB

Plus there’s a child friendly show at 17:30, The Gilded Balloon, Teviot (Venue 41) Until 26th Aug

Tickets for this can be bought here:

http://bit.ly/2OLd7D4